SELECT ISSUE

Revista Romana de Boli Infectioase | Volumul XVI, Nr. 2, An 2013
ISSN 1454-3389  |  e-ISSN 2069-6051
ISSN-L 1454-3389
DOI: 10.37897/RJID

Indexată BDI  |  IDB Indexed

DOAJ
Ebsco Host - Medline
DOI - Crossref

HIGHLIGHTS

Publicarea de articole științifice

Stimați cititori, vă reamintim că autorii primi ai articolelor științifice pot acumula 80 de credite EMC în urma publicării. Dacă un articol are mai mulți autori, cele 80 de credite [...]

PREMIU NAȚIONAL AUTORI

RJID și SNRBI oferă anual Premiul Național pentru Știință și Cercetare - pentru autorii celor mai bune articole științifice publicate [...]

Plagiatul – în actualitate

Tema plagiatului este tot mai mult discutată în ultima vreme. Apariția unor programe performante de căutare și identificare a similitudinilor între texte [...]

PREDICTING HOTSPOTS FOR INFLUENZA VIRUS REASSORTMENT

, , , , , , , , and

ABSTRACT

The 1957 and 1968 influenza pandemics, each of which killed ≈1 million persons, arose through reassortment events. Influenza virus in humans and domestic animals could reassort and cause another pandemic. To identify geographic areas where agricultural production systems are conducive to reassortment, we fitted multivariate regression models to surveillance data on influenza A virus subtype H5N1 among poultry in China and Egypt and subtype H3N2 among humans. We then applied the models across Asia and Egypt to predict where subtype H3N2 from humans and subtype H5N1 from birds overlap; this overlap serves as a proxy for co-infection and in vivo reassortment. For Asia, we refined the prioritization by identifying areas that also have high swine density. Potential geographic foci of reassortment include the northern plains of India, coastal and central provinces of China, the western Korean Peninsula and southwestern Japan in Asia, and the Nile Delta in Egypt.

Full text | PDF

Leave a Reply